The North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh. Angie Newsome/Carolina Public Press
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March 2, 2015

RALEIGH — After two weeks of skeleton sessions and cancelled committee hearings, the N.C. General Assembly returns to a somewhat normal schedule in a slightly less-slushy capital. Budget hearings start […]

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February 27, 2015

In honor of Sunshine Week, Carolina Public Press will hold its Full Disclosure training seminar on understanding and using public records laws on March 20. The training is for working journalists, students, policymakers, public officials and community members interested in understanding state and federal public records laws.

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February 27, 2015

Carolina Public Press’s next Newsmakers forum will feature journalists and open government advocates discussing best practices — and challenges — to local governments. The forum will also follow an in-depth and investigative reporting project, to be published in March, analyzing how often and why county commissions in Western North Carolina go into closed session.

Coal ash ponds and basins at Duke Energy's Asheville plant. Duke Energy graphic
Featured
February 24, 2015

The indictments do not spell out the exact violations, but an environmental attorney who has sued the company over problems at the Asheville plant said the charges most likely result in part from Duke’s management of leaks at the two coal ash ponds on the Buncombe County site.

Covert surveillance budget ammendment
Featured
February 23, 2015

At its Tuesday, Feb. 24 meeting, the council is slated to consider using state drug-seizure funds for the gear, which is described in a city staff report as “audio/video” equipment that would be used to secure evidence of drug trafficking and prostitution. The vote takes place during a period of mounting concerns about surveillance by law enforcement.

Click to download a PDF of this presentation.
Featured
February 20, 2015

This webinar from Carolina Public Press is for journalists, students, lawmakers, policy officials and community members interested in learning more about the national forests and their environmental, community and economic impacts at the local, regional and state level.

  • The North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh. Angie Newsome/Carolina Public Press
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  • Coal ash ponds and basins at Duke Energy's Asheville plant. Duke Energy graphic
  • Covert surveillance budget ammendment
  • Click to download a PDF of this presentation.

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The North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh. Angie Newsome/Carolina Public Press

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RALEIGH — After two weeks of skeleton sessions and cancelled committee hearings, the N.C. General Assembly returns to a somewhat normal schedule ...

More Top News

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  • The North Carolina General Assembly in Raleigh. Angie Newsome/Carolina Public Press
  • Click to view Carolina Public Press's continuing reports on coal ash concerns in Asheville.
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  • Coal ash ponds and basins at Duke Energy's Asheville plant. Duke Energy graphic
  • Covert surveillance budget ammendment
  • Click to download a PDF of this presentation.
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  • Goldsboro Headlight April 30 1896
  • Graph courtesy of the Fiscal Research Division
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  • File photo by Katie Bailey/Carolina Public Press
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  • Cassius Cash, the new superintendent of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, speaks during an event in Boston, Ma. Photo courtesy of the National Park Service